Category: Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Tina Fey interviewed on Behind the Lens with Pete Hammond

Tina Fey interviewed on Behind the Lens with Pete Hammond

Tina Fey was interviewed on Behind the Lens with Pete Hammond, where she talked about how Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt wasn’t a good fit for a broadcast network, how she was upset about Great News getting canceled after two seasons, being the first female head writer of SNL, and more. Watch the full interview below!

Tina Fey announces ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ interactive special

Tina Fey announces ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ interactive special

Tina Fey announced a new ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’ interactive special during a panel held on Wednesday (May 8) in NYC. Our gallery has been updated with photos from the event and you can watch the video of the announcement below!

Three months after wrapping its four-season run on Netflix, Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt is returning.

The streamer on Wednesday announced that it is reteaming with creators Tina Fey and Robert Carlock for an interactive special featuring stars Ellie Kemper, Tituss Burgess, Jane Krakowski and Carol Kane. The special is similar to Netflix’s Black Mirror film Bandersnatch in that viewers will be able to make choices for the characters.

“We’re thrilled to announce that we’re about to start production on an all-new interactive Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt special, set to debut on Netflix in 2020,” Fey said Wednesday during a Netflix For Your Consideration Emmy panel. “Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt was one of the first original comedy series on Netflix, and now it will be its first interactive comedy event. Fans will be able to make choices on behalf of our characters, taking different story paths with, of course, different jokes. I think it’s a great fit for our show and will be a great way to officially complete the series.”

Fey and Carlock will return to executive produce alongside Jeff Richmond, Sam Means and David Miner. The special, like Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, hails from Universal Television.

Source: The Hollywood Reporter

‘Kimmy Schmidt’: Tina Fey and Robert Carlock on Thinking Behind Finale’s Happy Endings

Tina and Robert Carlock were interviewed by The Hollywood Reporter to talk about the final episodes of ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’. You can read the entire interview below:

The co-creators of the NBC-turned-Netflix comedy series also talk about the advantages of streaming and whether they’d make another series for such a platform, and break down some of the other big moments in the last six episodes.

[The following story contains spoilers for the second half of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt‘s fourth and final season.]

When Tina Fey and Robert Carlock created Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt, it was for their 30 Rock home NBC. But before the series’ premiered it moved from NBC to Netflix, where Fey and Carlock made an additional three seasons, the last of which was split into two halves, with the final six episodes dropping last Friday.

The series has been a perennial awards contender and seemingly found a significant following online (Netflix, like other streamers, famously doesn’t release viewership information), but speaking with The Hollywood Reporter after wrapping production on her first streaming series, Fey remains a little perplexed by how people can watch an entire season in one weekend.

“It’s interesting, you hear from people, ‘Oh, yeah, I watched them all this weekend,'” she says. “And it’s a little bit like being a chef and hearing like, ‘No, I ate everything. I ate everything the restaurant had. I threw up everywhere, but it was good.'”

Continue reading ‘Kimmy Schmidt’: Tina Fey and Robert Carlock on Thinking Behind Finale’s Happy Endings

Tina Fey and Robert Carlock on the end of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Tina Fey and Robert Carlock on the end of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt

Tina and Robert Carlock were interviewed by the AV Club to talk about the end of ‘Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt‘. Read the full interview below!

In the spring of 2015, the fact that Tina Fey and Robert Carlock had created a sitcom about a survivor of a doomsday cult wasn’t half as strange as where that show had ended up: Produced for NBC, it was later acquired by Netflix and set to be the first original comedy series to debut on the streaming service. Today, the streaming service pumps out so many series and movies—and has pushed other outlets to do the same—that it’s inspired one of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt’s best running gags. House Flix subscribers will be missing out, but the final six episodes of Kimberly Cougar Schmidt’s namesake series arrive on Netflix this Friday, January 25. The A.V. Club spoke with Fey and Carlock about the end of the series, the potential for a feature-length follow-up, and explaining to Fey’s oldest child how Saturday Night Live can be watched, live, on a Saturday night.

The A.V. Club: So much has changed, so rapidly, in the television industry in the past few years—what’s it been like to work in TV as things have shifted more toward streaming, and what was it like to be working on one of the shows that was instrumental in that shift? 

Tina Fey: The funny little journey that this show had is that it started for broadcast—the first 13 episodes were made and written and edited with the intention that they would be on NBC. And then [then-network chair of NBC] Bob Greenblatt wisely saw that there wasn’t a slot for a show like this—this premise, it is harder to sell on broadcast TV. Rather than giving us a choice of a strange time slot in the summer or something, he allowed us to take the show to Netflix, who took it immediately, which was very exciting to us because it was before they had as much original programming and they were looking to launch original things.

So we made the first 13 broadcast-style, and then after they launched we learned anecdotally that a lot of the audience was young. I guess the main part of our audience is still that like 18-to-whatever. But there was a lot of 12-, 13-, 14-year-old kids watching the show. And I said, going into season two, “Now we’re on streaming, but I feel like a nude shower intercourse scene doesn’t fit our universe.” [Laughs.] So except for the delight of not having to make a really strict timing, we kept things clean and we kept writing toward act breaks in a way that you would do on broadcast, but just the beauty of not having to have every episode be 21 minutes and 15 seconds long I think was the greatest gift. Wouldn’t you say, Robert?

Robert Carlock: The amount of time it takes to get to that arbitrary timing—it’s soul-sucking. But we love broadcast television!

Continue reading Tina Fey and Robert Carlock on the end of Unbreakable Kimmy Schmidt